Forehand Swing Path Options

Description

This video lesson shows the proper swing path and some options that the pros use on their Forehands

 

Responses (16)

NOTE: Comments will appear after they are approved.
  1. Poida
    December 25, 2016 at 4:53 am · Reply

    Thanks Jorge for the swing path follow-up and how it affects topspin. However, the swing path alone does not create “topspin”. It’s important to understand the following:

    1) the racket angle 2) the speed of the racket through the contact zone along with 3) the racket path combined/blended are integral and have a huge impact on topspin creation ……. along with the characteristics of the incoming ball. All of these factors need to to managed by players within their optimum “the contact zone”.

    In your video, the racket angle and racket speed factors are not addressed, nor is the contact zone and the incoming ball characteristics. It’s important/vital to player development that the physics of ball contact and the influence on ball control be well understood. This is “the physics of tennis” that simply cannot be separated in any tennis stroke along with the tactical intention, they are always present and always influencing ball control. Federer and his tour peers are masters of ball control. That’s why they win major titles and reside in the top 10.

    Carly needs to understand this and apply it to improve her forehand, and all of her strokes. The reason she hits reverse FHs is because she is “late” getting her racket into her optimum hitting zone, the ball is too close to her body. She’s not alone, I do it too, and so does Fed, Nadal, and all the way down to 4.0 players. I’ll explain the physics at play with the reverse FH in my next post. I hope you will share this information with her and your tennis followers.

    We’re all here to learn and help grow this wonderful game for life. Thanks for putting out your video resources and blog, it’s a great opportunity for us all to share and explore our challenges with tennis.

    Merry Xmas and all the best for 2017!

    Poida

  2. Poida
    December 22, 2016 at 3:54 am · Reply

    Hi Jorge, hoping you can “research” and clarify some of the comments below in your reply to Frank that l’ve outlined below. Thanks, Poida

    December 15, 2016 at 5:05 pm · Reply

    “Hi Frank… The pocket to pocket swing is just my preferred phase for what I want to have players do when hitting a dipping short angle type of ball… perhaps a passing shot.”

    My reply: This should be prefaced right from the beginning to avoid confusion. You’re saying now this is for a specific situation specialty shot vs a standard rally ball baseline to baseline. How do you hit a dipper short ball with full extension?

    “The Hula Hoop reefers to the path of the HAND. The racket would be more extended.”

    My reply: If the hand follows the hula hoop how is there extension? That is what Frank is quite correctly pointing out re your daughter’s FH, it lacks extension.

    “So what I would like to see my players do is have a variety of finishes because I think that is how you make the ball behave and send different trajectories, but I always want their to me full (or close to full) extension. Meaning that the players should extend towards the target before making the finish. I hope that clarifies things”

    My reply: Please explain how the racket finish positions can affect ball behavior/trajectories when the ball is only on the racket “at contact” for .004 seconds?

    My reply: Look forward to your follow-up Jorge, thanks again Frank for initiating this helpful dialogue with your insightful observations and comments.

    • Jorge Capestany
      December 23, 2016 at 4:26 pm · Reply

      OK, Your question is: Please explain how the racket finish positions can affect ball behavior/trajectories when the ball is only on the racket “at contact” for .004 seconds?

      Jorge’s response: While the ball is only on the strings for a very short time, the FINISH effects the swing path. For example high-to-low OR low-to-high. This swing path effects how the ball will behave when it is on the strings. So a low-to-high swing will impart topspin even if the ball is on the strings for a short time. The reverse is true for high-to-low swing path for under spin.

      So… the various finishes effects the swing path of the racket which in turn effects the trajectory and spin of the ball. So that is why IMO the finishes can effect the ball behavior/trajectory. Hope that helps.

  3. Poida
    December 14, 2016 at 2:32 pm · Reply

    Frank’s other questions are also excellent and worthy of specific comments and analysis:

    “What are your thoughts on:

    1. The preferred length of swing and

    2. Closing the racket face on the forehand back swing and/or dropping the racket head below the flight of the ball for added topspin rather than utilizing the rotational hula hoop analogy on the video?

    I look forward to hearing from you!”

    I too look forward to your responses re the above, thanks Frank for posting these excellent questions.

    • Jorge Capestany
      December 15, 2016 at 4:59 pm · Reply

      Here you go…

      1) On preferred length of swing: I have fond that many of my player do NOT extend towards the target as much as they should. Definitely not as much as the pros so when they hit. This is for sure one of the main things I have noticed when I study pro footage

      2) I think there is no doubt that most pros do close their racket face (palm down) in most cases on the FH. They also drop their racket head lower than the ball before their point of contact so they have their racket moving slightly upwards. To my surprise, many of the best topspin forehand are not super lower than the ball, just a little bit. I also think hat it is a combination of both dropping the racket head, but the hula hoop path analogy is still pretty accurate as well just watch some of the slow motion videos on my site and I think you will see that. Thanks for commenting… JC

  4. Poida
    December 14, 2016 at 2:19 pm · Reply

    Jorge, with all due respect, I don’t think you’ve addressed Frank Sacks question about the extension of the hitting zone with the reference to the link you posted analyzing Rafa’s FH, where you’re referencing turning a doorknob and wrist action post contact – you’ve not addressed how far forward his hand tracks the racket out towards the target area.

    Perhaps you can review the matter of the hitting zone in more detail. There is also great debate about this turning a doorknob analogy in terms of what pros are doing and what it looks like they’re doing.

  5. JP
    November 12, 2015 at 10:33 pm · Reply

    Coach mum? 😃 Enjoying your video’s.great way to explain topspin. Very down to earth and understandable to all levels of tennisplayers. Keep it up. Cheers, JP

  6. COSIMO TORINO
    November 11, 2015 at 6:48 am · Reply

    i tuoi tips sono molto
    utili e intuitivi per i ragazzi , il cerchio dà all’allievo l’immagine della rotondità del movimento sia in diagonale che orrizzontale e verticale.
    grazie jorge

  7. Roy
    November 10, 2015 at 7:37 pm · Reply

    Very good. I like the hula-hoop as a swing path guide. I have a problem with my players not keeping their wrists loose during the swing. I have a 3 step rule, 1 pull, 2 pop, and 3 roll. I tell them Pull, Pop, and Roll! The pull is to make sure they lead with the but end, the pop is to get them hitting through the shot(a lot of my players hit into the net trying to hit more top spin because the don’t hit through the ball) and the roll is to make sure they finish high and generate top spin. Thanks for your videos!

    • Jorge Capestany
      November 10, 2015 at 9:02 pm · Reply

      Thanks Roy, I like the Pull, Pop, an Roll idea

  8. Sandy Badillo
    November 10, 2015 at 7:11 pm · Reply

    I like this! I use hula hoops on court for fitness so this will be an easy one. I also realized your racket head on the back swing is pretty much parallel to ground and not dropped. Like pocket to shoulder! When it is pocket to hairdo is that not because you are hitting it late?
    Sandy

    • Jorge Capestany
      November 10, 2015 at 9:04 pm · Reply

      I do think that it because of hitting late. In fact, a couple years ago at the Australian Open I got to ask uncle Ton why Rafa does this and Toni stated it was because Rafa was hitting late, NOT because of the need for more distance to decelerate as has been proposed by many people.

  9. Frank Sacks
    November 10, 2015 at 7:03 pm · Reply

    Jorge,

    I hope you are well. You always do a great job! I have some questions about the length of the hitting zone in the video. It seems that by going to from pocket to shoulder your daughter may be getting increased topspin but her stroke appears to require precise timing and extra time on the court. There is no discussion regarding the contact point or hitting zone length which means that the forward racket movement appears to minimal due to the hula hoop rotational pattern of the stroke. What are your thoughts on the preferred length of swing and closing the racket face on the forehand back swing and/or dropping the racket head below the flight of the ball for added topspin rather than utilizing the rotational hula hoop analogy on the video? I look forward to hearing from you!

    Best regards,

    Frank Sacks MBA, USPTA/PTR
    Managing Member
    Midwest Tennis Programs, LLC

    • Jorge Capestany
      November 10, 2015 at 9:06 pm · Reply

      I do think that extension towards the target is very important. I have a video that shows this that can been seen here…. https://www.jorgecapestany.com/portfolio-item/rafa-nadal-forehand-analysis/

    • Jorge Capestany
      December 15, 2016 at 5:05 pm · Reply

      Hi Frank… The pocket to pocket swing is just my preferred phase for what I want to have players do when hitting a dipping short angle type of ball… perhaps a passing shot. The Hula Hoop reefers to the path of the HAND. The racket would be more extended. So what I would like to see my players do is have a variety of finishes because I think that is how you make the ball behave and send different trajectories, but I always want their to me full (or close to full) extension. Meaning that the players should extend towards the target before making the finish. I hope that clarifies things.. Nice to hear from you.

  10. eddie pasternak
    November 10, 2015 at 6:55 pm · Reply

    nice job..i’ve been teaching for 25 yrs..and i think you do one of the best jobs of the many explanations for tennis “fixes” out there!!

    very best,
    eddie pasternak

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