Understanding YOUR Optimal Power Level

Description

In this video, Master Professional Jorge Capestany talks about the important aspects of a great passing shot in tennis.

Project Details

  • Date January 22, 2018
  • Tags Baseline Play

Responses (22)

NOTE: Comments will appear after they are approved.
  1. Dottie Wiencek
    July 20, 2018 at 1:31 am · Reply

    How do I add power? What technique do you suggest?

    • Jorge Capestany
      July 24, 2018 at 10:50 pm · Reply

      It’s different for every person but at the end of the day, it all has to do with increasing your racquet head speed. Some people can do that with just strength while others have to use a more efficient version of the kinetic link.

  2. Bhushan Joshi
    July 18, 2018 at 2:10 pm · Reply

    Hey Jorge, this is really helpful, thanks a lot.
    One question… Do we also need to adjust the contact point during a shot, depending on the power level?
    Thanks again!

    • Jorge Capestany
      July 24, 2018 at 10:49 pm · Reply

      I would say no.. I typically try to keep the optimal point of contact which is just in front of the front leg.

  3. Peg
    April 20, 2018 at 2:56 am · Reply

    Love your quote “This is a game of error management.” Spot on advice of playing at a proper power level. We sometimes wrongly thing if I just hit it harder it will be great, but the errors follow. I asked a mutual friend, Elaina M. “how did I not know about Jorge sooner?” Glad I found you and thanks for all the videos and helpful practical information.

    • Jorge Capestany
      April 25, 2018 at 12:26 am · Reply

      Thanks Peg

  4. Coach Stretch
    January 24, 2018 at 4:29 am · Reply

    Great stuff!
    Nice information about control.

  5. Martin Black
    January 24, 2018 at 1:31 am · Reply

    Good concept. My goal when receiving in doubles is just to hit a “5-6” return and keep it away from the net man. I only go for a “7-8” if I can get a 2nd serve on my FH. Almost all of my doubles matches (4.5 senior) with our regular guys comes down to who makes the fewest return or volley errors. It’s why I like to watch WTA doubles since the ladies make so many quality shots and force the winning team to hit more than just one or two good shots each point.

  6. Bill Macdonald
    January 23, 2018 at 7:41 pm · Reply

    Are you talking primarily baseline to baseline rallying points?
    By the way, I am an old friend of Peter Burling

    • Jorge Capestany
      January 24, 2018 at 6:02 pm · Reply

      Yes, mostly baseline pints but it would also apply to most other shots.

  7. Ashwin Kohli
    January 23, 2018 at 5:31 pm · Reply

    super video Mr.Capestany… now realized after seeing your video the reason for injuring myself – was playing at 10 power level persistently on a single day.

  8. Ashwin
    January 23, 2018 at 5:31 pm · Reply

    super video Mr.Capestany… now realized after seeing your video the reason for injuring myself – was playing at 10 power level persistently on a single day.

  9. Jay
    January 23, 2018 at 4:18 pm · Reply

    This is such an awesome video. I always played around with power levels as a video game would do when I played with different people on court. I know my level is about 7 as well but when you play you sometimes lose sight of the level in the pursuit of winning a point. Good job, Jorge!!! Loved it.

    • Jorge Capestany
      January 24, 2018 at 6:02 pm · Reply

      Thanks Jay

  10. jorg Rauthe
    January 23, 2018 at 2:59 pm · Reply

    Jorge, very useful video. This is my weakest point, overhitting and making too many errors .I always like your no-nonsense to the point approach. Thanks

    • Jorge Capestany
      January 24, 2018 at 6:02 pm · Reply

      Thanks Jorg

  11. Sanika Luktuke
    January 23, 2018 at 2:11 pm · Reply

    Could you please send a video about’How to control the balls which your opponent has hit to you’??It will be really helpful…

  12. Debbie
    January 23, 2018 at 2:10 pm · Reply

    Thank you. Very helpful. This may also explain why smart players may crush the ball in practice but peel back the power in a match or even in important points like a tiebreaker.

  13. Dale
    January 23, 2018 at 1:50 pm · Reply

    I teach tennis also. The problem I have with some juniors is having them understanding that adding more power causes less accuracy. Like your daughter missed most balls in the alley which for me is more about her aim points and not about the power. Since power is so important in modern tennis, I would have your daughter play most of her time at speed 8, but less towards the lines. Usually juniors try to hit winners by going harder and closer to the lines. That’s when they miss the most.

    • Jorge Capestany
      January 24, 2018 at 7:49 pm · Reply

      Good point Dale.

  14. Thad
    January 23, 2018 at 1:13 pm · Reply

    I will experiment with it. Thanks.

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